Archive for March 22nd, 2012

22
Mar
12

How important is my OBD?

The EPA has regulations in place establishing requirements for on-board diagnostic (OBD) systems on light-duty vehicles and light-duty trucks beginning with the 1994 model year. The purpose of the OBD system is to assure proper emission control system operation for the vehicle’s lifetime by monitoring emission-related components and systems for deterioration and malfunction.

Vehicle manufacturers had to develop ways to diagnose problems generated by the new electronic hardware found under the hood. Thus, the first OBD systems were developed by auto manufacturers in the early 1980’s as electronic systems replaced mechanical systems.

The engines in today’s vehicles are largely electronically controlled, with sensors and actuators that sense the operation of specific components (e.g., the oxygen sensor) and actuate others (e.g., the fuel injector) to maintain optimal engine control. An on-board computer, known sometimes as a “powertrain control module” or an “engine control unit,” controls all of these systems. With proper software, the on-board computer is capable of monitoring all of the sensors and actuators to determine whether they are working as intended and to notify you when they are not working correctly. So make sure you don’t ignore your Check engine light because it is an important component in keeping your car running smoothly! And if your car has a warning light showing, bring it to Lone Star Bavarian to have it diagnosed

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